Tag Archives: running breaks

Intuitive intervals: Using a heart rate monitor to pace your run/walk intervals

If you have a Garmin watch you can set it to alert you during workouts if your heart rate goes higher or lower than a given threshold… kind of like a built in speed limit monitor for your heart rate.

I tried this feature once and quickly disabled it. I wanted to just run at my own pace and found the alarms when I reached a moderate heart rate annoying.

After a long recent layoff, as I recently started ramping up training, I found basic runs to be a bit too difficult, and sure enough my heart rate would rocket into marathon pace and the lactate threshold. It’s one reason I started doing Galloway style intervals, run/walking the workouts in 2 minute run, 1 minute walk intervals.

Galloway Intervals kept my heart rate level on-average: Even if it spiked during the runs, the minute of walking would bring it back down, the overall average more closely resembling a typical easy run. And overall the effort on these runs didn’t feel terribly difficult.

I’ve since gone on actual full-length training runs of 30+ minutes, and this past weekend I ran a 10K (albeit at closer to regular training paces), so I’m now in condition to run at distance again.

But I want to improve the usage of my natural speed. Now that I track walks on my Garmin watch, I can track paces of not just my walks, but those moments when I run across streets and the pace of those brief, hurried sprints that have always been a part of Working Class Running.

I find those easy, brief sprints vary around a 5:00-7:30 pace without much difficulty. I have speed, but it’s hard to maintain that speed over anything beyond those random little sprints. Even in 400 meter repeats and other workouts I find it very tough.

Is there a way to develop my ability to use that speed at distance in a race?

I think there’s a way, and it goes back to that once-annoying Garmin alert feature.

Continue reading
Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Sasha Pachev does this and I think for some it might be worth doing as well.

Every few hours, take a break, go outside, and run a mile. It doesn’t have to be fast, though it can be. Get back inside, and go back to whatever you were doing before.

Pachev calls it his Always On The Run Routine. He does more typical training each day, but aside from that he sneaks in a mile here, a mile there, throughout every day. It’s a sneaky way to get 20-25 extra miles on top of your training.

A great time to do this is right before or right after eating breakfast or lunch. A run will prime the body for optimal nutrient absorption, and this will allow more of any protein or carbs consumed to be utilized effectively within that optimal half hour window of exercise.

Now, some of you have to dress impeccably for your jobs and doing a little run during the day is not practical. Some of you work on the umpteenth floor of a Downtown tower and can’t practically get to the ground floor, run a mile and come back in 15 minutes. Of course it’s not going to be practical for some during the workday.

But for many, especially though who can dress a bit more casually, or don’t mind running in their work clothes, it may be a useful way to sneak in some extra bits of training.

Quick tip: Little mile runs during the day

Tagged , , , ,